Canada will not attend PanAms

Though I feel rotten for the Canadian athletes who trained an extra year for their last shot at qualifying for Tokyo, I agree with this decision.

As you know, in recent days Canada has had the worst COVID numbers of any English speaking nation in the world.

Gymnastics Canada has made the very difficult decision to not enter teams in the upcoming 2021 Senior Pan American Championships being held in Rio de Janeiro, BRA between June 4-13, 2021 and the 2021 Junior Pan American Championships slated for Guadalajara, MEX (artistic), and Guatemala City, GUA (rhythmic) due to health and safety concerns resulting from the COVID-19 global pandemic. …

The Senior Pan American Championships were Canada’s last chance qualifier event for the Tokyo Olympic Games in men’s artistic, women’s artistic, and rhythmic gymnastics. …

“We realize the impact these decisions have on our athletes, especially those senior athletes that have dedicated so many years to their ambition of competing at the Olympic Games,” added Moss. “We will do everything we can not only to support all athletes and coaches impacted by this decision through this difficult period, but to also provide hope and opportunity moving forward towards their international goals in the future.”

Athletes and coaches did have the opportunity to appeal this decision, and GymCan went through the Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada (SDRCC) arbitration process with these individuals to show transparency around the decision. The result of that appeal, which ruled in GymCan’s favour, was delivered to all parties on May 6th, 2021.

Gymnastics Canada

Gymnastics Canada Virtual Competitions

Many are wondering if this is going to work.

An even bigger problem is that some National Team contenders are still locked out of their Gyms. Manitoba, for example, has been locked out for 5 months total during the pandemic.

Details are posted on Vimeo.

Via email:

Ottawa, ON (February 3, 2021) – In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, Gymnastics Canada will be holding their winter and spring events virtually with athletes and coaches submitting their videos for judging from their gyms across the country.

In an effort to give participants the most flexibility possible in preparing their competitive routines, multiple competitive options have been put in place for many of the disciplines.

The Elite Canada in women’s artistic gymnastics will kick-off the season with athletes submitting their videos from February 3-9, and judging taking place from February 12-14. Their season will continue with two more “Technical Trials” taking place from March 14-17, and from April 18-21. The awards for this series of events will be presented following the judging of the last event on April 24th.

Athletes will enter the events they feel ready to compete in, and the winners will be chosen from the top scores gathered from all of the competitions.

“This is such a unique situation for everyone involved in sport in Canada, and our team has worked really hard to meet the demands of our community to be able to hold safe and fair competitive opportunities for everyone,” said Ian Moss, CEO of Gymnastics Canada.

“Virtual competitions, while not being able to mimic the excitement and stress of live competition, are still able to offer our athletes and coaches the opportunity to present what they have been able to work on over the last several months in as real a competitive setting as is possible …”

The Elite Canada in men’s artistic gymnastics will see athletes submitting their routines for judging from February 11-17th, and judging taking place from February 19-21. … They will also be holding a technical trials in early March.

In trampoline gymnastics, athletes will have several opportunities to showcase their competitive routines via technical trials being held in February and March. Their Elite Canada event is set to take place this summer and will hopefully be held in-person …

Rounding out the spring season will be the Elite Canada in rhythmic gymnastics. Those athletes will submit their videos from March 17-24, with judging taking place from March 27-28. A test event may also be held at the end of February depending upon interest.

Change is the one constant as the country struggles to cope with COVID-19, so this calendar is very much subject to change as time moves forward. Please consult the GymCan website for the most up-to-date information.

Aleksandra Soldatova retires

Now age-22, Aleksandra was the 2016 Russian National All-around champion and one of the best in the Rhythmic world for many years.

She’s had problems for some time.

Now officially confirmed her retirement from professional sport, saying that she wants to fully concentrate on her health which was undermined by an eating disorder.

Rhythmic Gymnastics Europeans 2020

Russia, Bulgaria, Italy and Spain were some of the nations that did not compete.

Linoy Ashram became the first non-Russian European champion since 1997 with victory in Kyiv.

  1. Linoy Ashram (ISR)
  2. Alina Harnasko (BLR)
  3. Anastasia Salos (BLR)

In another historical first, Turkey won the team competition.

  1. Turkey (tiebreaker)
  2. Ukraine
  3. Azerbaijan

Worlds 2021 in Japan

Both Artistic and Rhythmic – October 2021.

This dual allocation comes after the decision by the Danish Gymnastics Federation in July to withdraw from hosting the 2021 Artistic Gymnastics World Championships in Copenhagen.

Aleksandra Soldatova on eating disorders

Aleksandra Soldatova is the 2018 World All-around Rhythmic bronze medalist representing Russia.  She plans to try out for the Tokyo Olympics.

I’d once starved myself for several days before realizing I was on the brink… that I’d reached my limit. Then I found the courage to tell my coach about my problems,” Soldatova said.

The 22-year-old has currently put her sporting career on hold to allow her the space to deal with her health problems.

She said she has managed to stop her bulimic behaviors with the help of her coach, her friends, and a psychologist, but admitted she still has nightmares in which she gains weight, which remains a fear. …

‘I could have starved for days’: Russian gymnastics queen Alexandra Soldatova on battle with bulimia

recommendations after watching Athlete A

Enya Tierney reflects on Netflix’s Athlete A documentary.

Some recommendations for coaches:

  • Most coaches were once a gymnast, treat your athletes the way you would have liked to be treated when you were one of them.

  • Just because when you were a gymnast, your coaches were too strict or abusive towards you, it does not mean it’s the only way you can coach. Remember that you can break the chain!

  • Positive reinforcement is the most effective and civilised coaching method.

  • Listening to your gymnasts is part of your job, make them feel you are on their side!

  • If they complain about pains and physical restrictions don’t assume they are exaggerating. Listen to them, adapt your session plans to their needs, and be in touch with parents and doctors to find out what’s best for your athlete.

  • Make your feedback useful. We have advice on how to give good feedback on our Gym etiquette: three simple things to do at gymnastics training.

  • Your job is not only to make good athletes. It’s also about their personal and physical development, protecting their best interest, and giving them a safe and fear-free environment to practice. …

WHAT’S WRONG WITH RG COACHING? REFLECTIONS ON NETFLIX’S ATHLETE A