Men’s Code – 8 or 10 skills?

At the 2015 World Championships Glasgow, word was that the Men’s Code of Points would go from 10 skills to 8 after Rio, to match WAG. The DRAFT 2020 Code had 8 skills, 4 element groups.

Much later the final decision of FIG MTC was to stay with 10 counting skills. I’ve not yet heard the rationale.

An Aussie gymnast, Luke Wiwatowski, who must plan different routines for 8 or 10 skills, weighs in.

The “We Say You Do” Model Of Code Review Is Broken

8 skills

Gymnastics – safest landing positions

Dr. Dave Tilley is concerned:

… the unfortunate reality is that the typical way gymnasts were taught to land growing up (me included) may not be the safest for them and most effective to stick skills. Not to mention coaches are also unfortunately very mis-informed about what the best available science suggests for proper landing mechanics. The concerning typical landing position that we need to move away from is one of

• Knees and feet together
• Glutes engage with the “hips tucked under” into hollow
• Knee dominant landing strategy
• Stiff impact with upright torso

… The reality of the situation is that we need to change the way gymnasts land, starting from a very young age. The more ideal landing we should be teaching and forcing athletes to use is

• Feet hip width apart
• toes, knees, hips, and shoulders close to inline (generally)
• core engaged in relative neutral (not excessively hollowed or arched)
• proper angular displacement of the hip and knee joints
• hip angle generally 30 degrees, and trunk / tibial lines close to parallel …

Why Gymnasts Must Change How They Land

With greatly increased difficulty being competed now and into the future, obviously the “best” landing positions are the ones that bring impact forces to zero with the least risk of injury, especially major injuries like ligament ruptures.

Most of the top male gymnasts in 2016 land their difficult skills in a very typical way.

Check these successful WAG landing positions. (Some are luck, of course. But many are skillful.)

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

8 new Men’s Gymnastics skills

The new skill from Japan’s Shirai has been awaited since a video of the 19-year-old training the element surfaced on the internet last year. The only other skill to be considered so difficult in the entire Men’s Code of Points is the Bretschneider, a complicated release move on Horizontal Bar introduced by Germany’s Andreas Bretschneider in 2014. …

FIG – Eight new elements named, added to Men’s Gymnastics Code of Points

Click through to see the entire list.

Shirai 3- click to see larger version
Shirai 3- click to see larger version

Cal goes 196.825

HEART this on Instagram.

BEARS. WIN. Cal tallies the SECOND-HIGHEST score in PROGRAM HISTORY with a 196.825! #Strive

A photo posted by Cal Women's Gymnastics (@calwgym) on Feb 8, 2016 at 8:55pm PST

//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js

Sylvie Seilnacht won Vault. We can argue whether or not this should be a 10.0 start. Personally I’m happy to see anything different than Y 1/1.

Click PLAY or watch it on Instagram.

Career-high 9.90 AND the vault title? YES @sylvie_seilnacht! ??

A video posted by Cal Women's Gymnastics (@calwgym) on Feb 8, 2016 at 8:10pm PST

//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js

MAG 2020 Code of Points draft

Mens Gymnastics Australia Podcast is reviewing the DRAFT Code of Points. The review period is over end of January. No doubt there will be changes to the next draft.

But if you are interested NOW, click through.

General – Part 1 / 7 2017 Draft CoP Series

Floor – Part 2 / 7 2017 Draft CoP Series

Pommel – Part 3 / 7 2017 Draft CoP Series

MAG Australia podcast

Katelyn Ohashi is tough

A do-over was allowed after Katelyn’s foot knocked out the Beam end cap.

UCLA freshman Katelyn Ohashi stood tiptoe on the balance beam in Arizona’s McKale Center. With one more dismount, her debut as an all-around competitor in college gymnastics would be complete. …

“The end of the beam came off,” said coach Valorie Kondos Field. “Her foot stepped on that, and (she) had a very scary fall, landing on her neck.” …

Ohashi, though, was quick to stand on her feet again and Kondos Field said afterward that the freshman was uninjured.

The judge panel ruled that the failed dismount was caused by an equipment malfunction and, to ensure fairness of play, Ohashi was allowed another go on the beam.

“I was definitely not expecting that at all,” Ohashi said. “But they asked me if I wanted to do it again. And I was like, yeah, of course.” …

Kondos Field was not enthusiastic about pushing the freshman to the front line. She told Ohashi that she didn’t have to go and that she could also do an easier dismount. But Ohashi refused both offers, insisting on completing a full routine. …

The judges gave Ohashi a 9.825 – a new career best for the freshman. The beam score was added into the individual total of 39.375 that won Ohashi the all-around meet.

Gymnast doesn’t let fall throw game off balance, leads UCLA to win

Click PLAY or watch the second routine on YouTube.

The NCAA is super cautious when it comes to medical issues. I’m surprised medical let her back on the Beam so quickly.

Ashleigh Gnat 10.0 Vault

OK. You could deduct this vault. But I’m happy to see the only DTY in the NCAA rewarded. Congratulations Ashleigh.

Click PLAY or watch it on Instagram.

How about this ? by @ash_gnat13?! ?#Perfection #HolyCow ??

A video posted by LSU Gymnastics (@lsugym) on Jan 22, 2016 at 9:09pm PST

//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js