Russian Swing diving

The House of Dancing Water is a water-based stage production written and directed by Franco Dragone. … premiered in September 2010. …

At the center of the theatre is a 3.7 million-gallon pool. Eleven automated stage lifts that fit neatly together can be raised a meter above the water’s surface or dropped seven meters below it, creating a pool deep enough for a diver to leap from a 24-meter-high platform. …

Click PLAY or watch it on Facebook.

Thanks Kelly.

a new dive – 513XD

Is a dive with 1.5 somersaults and 5 twists possible?

Some sport scientists believe it is but that a different arm action would be required. The body would tilt to the point of being near horizontal at one point before untilting for entry into the water.

diving-turns

Read the study by WILLIAM TONG AND HOLGER R. DULLIN – A NEW TWISTING SOMERSAULT – 513XD (PDF)

related – Fred Yeaden – LEARNING HOW TO TWIST FAST (PDF)

(via Lukewiwa)

Full Out – the movie

Full Out is now on Netflix. And on DVD.

I saw it on an airplane.

It’s great for kids.

Jennifer Beals was excellent as a tough Miss ValAna Golja and stunt double Victoria Moors were quite believable.

The cameos are fun: Alicia Sacramone, Sam Peszek, Jordyn Wieber, etc.

Click PLAY or watch a trailer on YouTube.

Ariana Berlin’s comeback story was made for Hollywood: Nearly-fatal car accident ends a young girl’s Olympic gymnastics aspirations. Girl turns to dance but does not give up her other dream of competing for the UCLA Gymnastics team. Girl gets an opportunity to make the team at UCLA and ends up becoming an All-American.

This wasn’t an inspirational movie plot, though; this was real life. …

Sadly Director Sean Cisterna did not bother keeping the Gymnastics accurate. With very little extra cost they could have made the film far more realistic. Wrong Gymnastics will turn off a number of gymnasts and fans. 😦

Diving – ripped entries

A very interesting article recommended by Tom Trapp. Like Artistic Gymnastics, some feel Diving has got too acrobatic. Difficulty weighted too much relative to execution.

There are two types of rippers, they discovered. There are those with the right body type — long, tapering legs and feet and highly flexible shoulders — who hold a streamlined, needlelike position with toes pointed to allow a gradual closure of the water. Then there are those who know how to jackknife themselves underwater to pull the waves down.

“We called that a seething rip,” Abraham says. “There’s no splash, but it looks like the water is boiling. Like there’s a wrestling match going on under there. . . . What’s happening is the divers are going in and curling up. Once their shoulders are in the water, they’re piking, so their trunk rolls, their back is down, and their back creates a lot of suction.” …

Hitting the water without a splash gets big cheers, but has Olympic diving gotten too dry?

rip entry 2

rip entry