how people learn

Some notes I took from a publication called Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn by John Hattie and Gregory C. R. Yates.

Hattie

• “Unless the material is strongly meaningful, relevant and timely, it is subject to rapid and substantial forgetting.”

• “Distributed practice is more effective than massed practice or cramming.”

• “It is far easier to build on coherently organised existing knowledge than it is to learn new material … When your prior knowledge is based upon misconception, however, it will create an obstacle, an effect called interference.”

• “Strong learning occurs when words and images are combined.”

• “When the mind actively does something with the stimulus, it becomes memorable.”

• “beginners benefit from clear step-by-step instructions and an absence of problem-solving tasks. On the other hand, highly knowledge- able learners may benefit from working on problems to solve and are held back by step-by-step instructions.”

I was most surprised to read this:

• “the VAK model. This model says that human beings, as individuals, naturally fit into one of three categories, associated with the input sensory systems that we use to process information: visual learners (V), auditory learners (A), and kinaesthetic learners (K) (or VAK, for short). It is said that most of us are visual learners and will benefit from instruction which features visual elements, imagery, or spatial relationships, at least when shown in visual form. Auditory learners benefit from hearing words and learn effectively through language and building vocabulary. Kinaesthetic learners learn from movement, from action, from doing things with their hands, and tactile resources in general. …

… we reach a clear conclusion: that there is not any recognised evidence suggesting that knowing or diagnosing learning styles will help you to teach your students any better than not knowing their learning style.”

You can read that article here. Consider how those findings affect your coaching, teaching and planning.

British reserves training at home?

As reported by BritishGymnewstics.

That’s surprising. Team USA has 3 reserves in Rio following the same training regime as the named team. In case of disaster a replacement would be instant and seamless.

(via Couch Gymnast)

coaching Robots

Nick Ruddock:

How do you want your athletes to remember their training in years to come?

How do you want them to remember the time you spent with them?

Would they have positive memories, or negative thoughts?

Are you suppressing character or allowing it to flourish?

Are you facilitating creativity or restricting it?

Do your athletes regularly laugh and smile whilst training?

Are you having fun whilst you coach?

Do you enjoy the time spent with your athletes?

Do they regularly laugh and smile whilst training?

Most importantly, does the thought of spending another ten years in your current conditions and environment scare you or excite you?

Food for thought as always …

15-Robots

Canadian 2020 Training Camp

For many nations the focus is now the Tokyo Olympics.

Yes that Kyna Fletcher over on the right side. Kyna was the WAG National Team Director for Canada’s record breaking 5th place team in London. She’s gone over to the other side to see how they are preparing. 🙂

LIKE this photo on Facebook.

only 7000 gymnasts in China

Canadian coach Liang Cheng is taking western style Gymnastics back to China. He set up his first club in 2012. And Inspire Sports is expanding.

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube. English language instruction.

Some in China feel mass participation clubs are needed.

Wang Tongjie, director of gymnastics at China’s General Administration of Sport:

… There are only 7,000 registered Chinese gymnasts, Wang said. The United States — with a population only one-fourth of China’s — has nearly 150,000 competing gymnasts at all levels. …

Team China is covered for now.

The future is not so certain.

“What we have is about to become broken, but the new system is yet to be established,” Ye said. He points to a former powerhouse that failed to qualify for Rio as a team this year as a tale of caution. “If we don’t change, we will be like Romania.” …

In China, ‘Happy Gymnastics’ replaces grind of strict study

(via Nancy Armour)

Western Australia Institute of Sport closing

I’ve been there once. A fantastic facility. This is terrible news.

Aussie gymnasts are devastated by the surprise announcement.

Gymnastics Australia posted Allana Slater’s response.

Here’s GA’s response.

Australian Gymnastics Blog open letter:
The Hon. Mia Davies MLA BMM
Minister for Sport and Recreation
Western Australia

GA President Jacqui Briggs-Weatherill:

“I would have expected that the chair of the Western Australian Institute of Sport [Peter Abery] would have at least had the courtesy to ring me and discuss this with me at a very minimum…I don’t even fully understand the reasons this decision has been made.

“We expected some cuts to the program because funding is tight across sport. We had no idea they were looking to close the program.”

The gym closure – set for December 31 – will equate to a saving of about $700,000 annually for the WAIS, which is funded by the Western Australian government and leave Melbourne’s elite training centre as the lone facility of its kind in Australia for female artistic gymnasts. …

The Age

on CONSISTENCY in Gymnastics

Breanna Whitman:

ConsistencyA word that encapsulates a string of weighty qualifications, it refers to strong performances no matter the circumstances, to mental toughness in the wake of joy and adversity, and to rock solid scores despite growing media and fan attention; focused routines in a sea of cameras and noise.

By this point, any fan even half following the coverage of the 2016 US Olympic Trials in San Jose, CA can probably tell you what the selection committee is looking for in its soon-to-be-announced 2016 Women’s Olympic Team: CONSISTENCY! …

GNN

Marta could select Simone and any combination of contenders at Olympic trials and still (probably) win the team competition in Rio. The main worry is team USA making mistakes when it counts in Rio.

More important than scoring potential is consistency. I recall being shocked Marta put Aly Raisman on the team at 2010 Worlds. She had many weaknesses. But Aly has always been consistent. I’m sure the selectors are looking at consistency in competition. Consistency in training. I’m betting Aly is #1 even over Simone.

FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2015, file photo, U.S. gymnasts Aly Raisman, right, and Simone Biles stretch before a training session at the Karolyi Ranch in New Waverly, Texas. Stardom, the kind that truly changes a life, awaits Biles. The two-time defending world all-around champion will go for a three-peat at the 2015 championships in Glasgow, Scotland starting this weekend. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 12, 2015, file photo, U.S. gymnasts Aly Raisman, right, and Simone Biles stretch before a training session at the Karolyi Ranch in New Waverly, Texas. Stardom, the kind that truly changes a life, awaits Biles. The two-time defending world all-around champion will go for a three-peat at the 2015 championships in Glasgow, Scotland starting this weekend. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)