rules for coaches in the Gym

Tony Retrosi:

My 5 Rules. These go for every employee AND team gymnast. 

• BE ON TIME. …

• DO NOT SIT DOWN IN THE GYM. …

• NO CELL PHONES IN THE GYM.  …. I make exceptions often (kids are home alone, waiting for a call back from Dr.) but I do not like this to be a habit. If you are videoing- use the gym IPad. …

• DO NOT COME TO ME WITH A PROBLEM WITHOUT A POTENTIAL SOLUTION. … 

• EVERYONE LEAVE WITH A SMILE. … 

TOO MANY RULES

Frank Sahlein’s Gymnastics Industry Survey

Frank’s company — 3rd Level Consulting — has an online survey open open until July 31st. It’s an INDEPENDENT Gymnastics Industry – Business Metrics and Trends Survey that might take 30min to complete.

Any coach, owner or manager who fills out the survey will get a complete report. The purpose is for you to better understand our market.

Check it out – Survey Monkey

love / hate line drills

The best reason to use line drills in your training plan is to get a lot done in a short period of time. All gymnasts are working.

For compulsories, they are an excellent way to ensure you are getting many reps of simple skills.

Click PLAY or watch a sample on Instagram.

On the other hand … I’ve seen Gyms where kids get sick of line drills. Sometimes quality suffers with less able gymnasts.

A good compromise is to use line drills occasionally.

Australia’s High Performance Plan

By the Los Angeles 2028 Olympics Games, Gymnastics Australia aspires for its athletes in three of the four Olympic Gymsports – Men’s Artistic, Women’s Artistic and Trampoline Gymnastics – to be podium performers; contenders for winning Olympic and World Championship medals.

To achieve this, GA has embarked on a ten-year strategy …

Gymnastics Australia release High Performance Plan for 2018 and beyond

Chow not moving to China

I just found out on Twitter.

Personally I feel both Australia and China need a full-time, resident Head Coach.

(via theGymter.net)

cost of J.O. Gymnastics training

Parents from North America are sharing their stories on the Chalk Bucket forum:

Level 3 over $5000 / year for tuition/comp fees/leo/etc. (not including travel expenses, spectator entry fees, practice leos, medical fees if she happens to get injured, and thousands of hair ties).

Level 3 $3000 / year. Same girl by level 7 $7000 / year.

Level 4. $7,000 / year. That does not include travel expenses, leotards, grips, etc….

$7-10,000 / year everything included.

Level 7-8. $7500-8000/year. This excludes any entrance fees or meet travel fees, etc. …

At level 9/10 it is very easy to spend above $20k a year

Level 10 around $25k / year

A mom at our gym put it succinctly – if you just put the money you spend on gymnastics from pre-team to Level 10/Elite, your son or daughter would have more than enough money to go to any college or university in the country by the time they turned 18. It is definitely a labor of love, there is very little ROI, even for those who get recruited to compete in college.

Read more – Give it to me straight!

One coach showed me a budget for the career of an Olympian. Cost was over a million dollars thought the parents only paid a small percentage of that.

paying for a Judging appeal

“Sport Education and Consulting”

This week Ken Miller and his wife Bertina Hsu-Miller stopped by Bermuda Gymnastics Association to give staff a quick introduction to their mission:

We do not teach the sport: rather we teach children how to do the sport.

The passion of Sport Education and Consulting is to teach and inspire coaches by improving their delivery skills and knowledge so they can maximize their positive impact on children’s lives.

Ken and Bertina reviewed pedagogy. Teaching and learning. We all agreed that talking at kids is not the most effective way to communicate. 😀

To learn more check their website:

totalgamesource.com

The Millers were on holiday, actually. Thanks for making the time to visit. 

parent run Gymnastics clubs

At the 50th anniversary party for my Gymnastics club in Canada I gave a short speech / slideshow. I’d spent 23 seasons at the Gym, some of my happiest years.

At the end — wanting to see another 50 years of success — I recommended the Parents Board of Directors sell the program to an owner. In general, non-profit parent run clubs are less effectively managed than by owners.

On the other hand, non-profit clubs rarely go out of business. They have proven revenue. Existing customers. They should be able to cut costs and return to a break even budget.

Sadly, parent run Stampede City Gymnastics in Calgary, Canada just locked their doors. An attempt to sell the club fell through.

This was the Gym that produced 2004 Olympian Kylie Stone.

Watch a TV news report on the closing. They weren’t able to pay their bills.

Some of the parents are still trying to save the club.