Lillehammer 2016 Youth Olympic Games

A lot of bests have been seen over the last 11 days here in snowy Norway.

The young Organising Committee has been superb, the volunteers numerous, efficient and helpful, the transport service straightforward, the Wi-Fi flawless. And the sport, while lacking the drama and intensity of an Olympics proper, has been exciting and good to watch, blending the innovative monobob and cross-country cross with older and more established disciplines.

To a far greater extent than at Sochi 2014, and more so than we are likely to see in Pyeongchang 2018 and Beijing 2022, there was fresh and natural snow at every venue, evoking a true winter sporting vibe. Crowds have been good for the most part, with a total attendance of 214,000, while thousands have flocked to the daily concerts and cultural events in Sjogg Park, one of the real successes of these Games. …

So where does this leave the future of the Youth Olympics now four editions have been and gone?

Has Lillehammer 2016 saved the Youth Olympic Games?

I was a doubter when IOC launched the YOG. But – much to my surprise – I’ve been impressed. I hope they are continued.

Some disagree. Click through to that article if you want to read about the controversy.

Thomas Bach Opening YOG

Click PLAY or watch a wrap-up video on YouTube.

Gymnastics – safest landing positions

Dr. Dave Tilley is concerned:

… the unfortunate reality is that the typical way gymnasts were taught to land growing up (me included) may not be the safest for them and most effective to stick skills. Not to mention coaches are also unfortunately very mis-informed about what the best available science suggests for proper landing mechanics. The concerning typical landing position that we need to move away from is one of

• Knees and feet together
• Glutes engage with the “hips tucked under” into hollow
• Knee dominant landing strategy
• Stiff impact with upright torso

… The reality of the situation is that we need to change the way gymnasts land, starting from a very young age. The more ideal landing we should be teaching and forcing athletes to use is

• Feet hip width apart
• toes, knees, hips, and shoulders close to inline (generally)
• core engaged in relative neutral (not excessively hollowed or arched)
• proper angular displacement of the hip and knee joints
• hip angle generally 30 degrees, and trunk / tibial lines close to parallel …

Why Gymnasts Must Change How They Land

With greatly increased difficulty being competed now and into the future, obviously the “best” landing positions are the ones that bring impact forces to zero with the least risk of injury, especially major injuries like ligament ruptures.

Most of the top male gymnasts in 2016 land their difficult skills in a very typical way.

Check these successful WAG landing positions. (Some are luck, of course. But many are skillful.)

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

Jesse Owens 1936 Berlin Olympics

Nick Zaccardi:

“More Than Gold: Jesse Owens and the 1936 Berlin Olympics,” a one-hour documentary on the track and field legend, will air on NBC on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. ET. …

“… the story of a pioneering athlete, who in the face of racial discrimination at home and the horrific theories and practices of Nazi Germany, performed at his best under immense pressure,” …

NBC

Click PLAY or watch it on NBC.

http://vplayer.nbcsports.com/p/BxmELC/nbcsports_embed/select/media/pnsbg1xr137X?parentUrl=

African American Olympians

Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially designated February as Black History Month.

Going back to 1980, there are 11 African Americans who made the USA Gymnastics Olympic Team.

Luci Collins (1980)
Ron Galimore (1980)
Charles Lakes (1988)
Betty Okino (1992)
Dominique Dawes (1992, 1996, 2000)
Jair Lynch (1992, 1996)
Chainey Umphrey (1996)
Tasha Schwikert (2000, 2004-alt.)
Annia Hatch (2004)
Gabby Douglas (2012)
John Orozco (2012)

There were a total of 11 Olympic Medals won:

Dominique Dawes (4) 1 Gold, 3 Bronze
Gabby Douglas (2) 2 Gold
Annia Hatch (2) 2 Silver
Betty Okino (1) 1 Bronze
Jair Lynch (1) 1 Silver
Tasha Schwikert (1) 1 Bronze

WENDY HILLIARD GYMNASTICS FOUNDATION

Ron Galimore today works for USAG
Ron Galimore today works for USAG

Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in America, is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. …

Cal goes 196.825

HEART this on Instagram.

BEARS. WIN. Cal tallies the SECOND-HIGHEST score in PROGRAM HISTORY with a 196.825! #Strive

A photo posted by Cal Women's Gymnastics (@calwgym) on Feb 8, 2016 at 8:55pm PST

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Sylvie Seilnacht won Vault. We can argue whether or not this should be a 10.0 start. Personally I’m happy to see anything different than Y 1/1.

Click PLAY or watch it on Instagram.

Career-high 9.90 AND the vault title? YES @sylvie_seilnacht! ??

A video posted by Cal Women's Gymnastics (@calwgym) on Feb 8, 2016 at 8:10pm PST

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crying at Gymnastics

Anne Josephson:

Is pushing kids until they cry just a part of gymnastics?

Here is the answer: yes and no.

… there are times when kids cry for a host of reasons that are normal and acceptable, perhaps even good. Crying can release tension. It can cue us that what we are doing matters. It can let the adults around the child know that the child is in distress and may need comforting or further guidance.

So how is a parent to know when the tears are a warning sign versus when the tears are just a normal part of life? Here are some things to consider …

IS PUSHING KIDS UNTIL THEY CRY JUST A PART OF GYMNASTICS?

Tips To Console Your Crying Child
Tips To Console Your Crying Child

related – THE KEY TO HAVING A HAPPY RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR COACH, ATHLETE OR PARENT

Katelyn Ohashi is tough

A do-over was allowed after Katelyn’s foot knocked out the Beam end cap.

UCLA freshman Katelyn Ohashi stood tiptoe on the balance beam in Arizona’s McKale Center. With one more dismount, her debut as an all-around competitor in college gymnastics would be complete. …

“The end of the beam came off,” said coach Valorie Kondos Field. “Her foot stepped on that, and (she) had a very scary fall, landing on her neck.” …

Ohashi, though, was quick to stand on her feet again and Kondos Field said afterward that the freshman was uninjured.

The judge panel ruled that the failed dismount was caused by an equipment malfunction and, to ensure fairness of play, Ohashi was allowed another go on the beam.

“I was definitely not expecting that at all,” Ohashi said. “But they asked me if I wanted to do it again. And I was like, yeah, of course.” …

Kondos Field was not enthusiastic about pushing the freshman to the front line. She told Ohashi that she didn’t have to go and that she could also do an easier dismount. But Ohashi refused both offers, insisting on completing a full routine. …

The judges gave Ohashi a 9.825 – a new career best for the freshman. The beam score was added into the individual total of 39.375 that won Ohashi the all-around meet.

Gymnast doesn’t let fall throw game off balance, leads UCLA to win

Click PLAY or watch the second routine on YouTube.

The NCAA is super cautious when it comes to medical issues. I’m surprised medical let her back on the Beam so quickly.

Ashleigh Gnat 10.0 Vault

OK. You could deduct this vault. But I’m happy to see the only DTY in the NCAA rewarded. Congratulations Ashleigh.

Click PLAY or watch it on Instagram.

How about this ? by @ash_gnat13?! ?#Perfection #HolyCow ??

A video posted by LSU Gymnastics (@lsugym) on Jan 22, 2016 at 9:09pm PST

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