Achilles injury in NCAA

Abstract
Achilles injury risk in women’s collegiate gymnastics is 10-fold higher than in all other collegiate sports. This study aims to identify risk factors for Achilles tendon ruptures in collegiate female gymnasts.

Hypothesis:
Gymnasts with Achilles tendon ruptures will be more likely to report early gymnastics specialization, elite-level training before college, and performance of high-difficulty skills on floor and vault. …

Factors Associated With Achilles Tendon Rupture in Women’s Collegiate Gymnastics

Published by

Rick Mc

Career gymnastics coach who loves the outdoors, and the internet.

One thought on “Achilles injury in NCAA”

  1. I maintain that a major contributor to Achilles ruptures is the tendency to not finish an accelerator element such as a back-handspring or whip to a proper body shape (hollow or slight pike) prior to takeoff for the culminating element of the pass. This is a very typical mistake (rooted in survival instinct) and results in the athlete striking the rebounding surface with their body already shaped into a tight arch. This body shape puts the ankle at a much more extreme position of dorsiflexion and stretches the Gastrocnemius/Soleus complex tremendously. The dishing action of the rebounding surface exacerbates this and helps to activate the myotatic stretch reflex as a protective action causing every recruited motor unit to fire all-or-nothing in a (hard-wired) effort to save the muscle. Often, this reflexive contraction is strong enough to tear the Achilles. This is even more likely when the Achilles is pre-disposed to injury through overuse, inflammation, previous traumatic injury, etc.

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