tie-breaking rule at Worlds

At the 2015 World Championships, the Uneven Bars final resulted in the coronation of four different World champions. This scenario is unlikely to repeat itself, as new rules allow ties to be broken at Worlds, just as they are at the Olympic Games.
If two or more gymnasts obtain the same total score in an event final, the one with the highest execution score will prevail. If there is still a tie, the higher difficulty score becomes the determining factor. In the All-around competition, the sum of the best three (for women) or five (for men) scores will establish the final ranking. 

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Rick Mc

Career gymnastics coach who loves the outdoors, and the internet.

5 thoughts on “tie-breaking rule at Worlds”

  1. I’m not sure they thought this through. “If two or more gymnasts obtain the same total score in an event final, the one with the highest execution score will prevail.” Okay, makes sense. But then: “If there is still a tie, the higher difficulty score becomes the determining factor.” If they have the same total score and the same execution score, then they have the same difficulty score. If they have the same E but different D, then they wouldn’t be tied.

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    1. I thought the same thing at first…
      Only situation where I could see two gymnasts having same E, but different D and still tying, is if one of the gymnasts received a Neutral deduction. ND is separate from the E score, correct?

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      1. How many people win with a neutral deduction though? Though I’m sure it’s happened on vault.

        Most neutral deductions are in conjunction with execution errors – eg steps out of bounds have the steps also taken as execution, over time on floor & beam is normally from steps/wobbles also (precious seconds wasted taking the steps & recovering), overtime on bars from falling off and not getting back on in time.

        Other neutral deductions are very rare at this level.

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