Entries Tagged 'psychology' ↓

it’s on us to stop sexual assault

A number of professional athletes have donated their time to support the message that sexual assault is never okay. Join them in taking the pledge to stop sexual assault at ItsOnUs.org.

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

Julius Thomas
Aly Raisman
Caroline Wozniacki
Jason Hammel
Khris Davis
Rudy Gay

ItsOnUs.org

what fearful gymnasts want you to know

JAG GYM:

I know that I am difficult to coach.

I worry that you don’t like me.

Being fearful is different than being stubborn.

I can’t just “stop it.”

Yelling or threatening me doesn’t solve my fear issues.

My fear is a very real thing.

I would give anything not to be scared.

It hurts when you ignore me.

Please be there for me.

Help me work through my fear. Be patient with me. Break the skill down into smaller parts. Find alternative skills for me to do that might be less scary to me. If I am still struggling, get my parents involved. Maybe I do need to see a sports psychologist. Maybe my problem is larger than gymnastics. Pay attention and be an advocate for me, not an adversary. You are my coach, and I need you.

“I KNOW I AM DIFFICULT TO COACH” AND NINE OTHER THINGS THAT FEARFUL GYMNASTS WANT TO THEIR COACHES TO KNOW

psychology of Beam

Click through for more detail. And a link to a coach’s perspective on this topic.

R.I.P. John Salmela

I’ve you ever met Canadian Sport Psychologist John Salmela, you’ve not forgotten him.

John
John H. Salmela, a native of Verdun, Québec, passed away on October 29, 2014. Born June 06, 1945, he was 69 years old. …

He came from humble beginnings and had a successful career as a national level gymnast and a member of university gymnastics teams that won national titles.

John subsequently pursued a 34 year teaching and research career that included positions at Université Laval, Université de Montréal, and the University of Ottawa, where he taught motor development and sport psychology courses in both English and French. He has authored/edited 20 books and written 250 articles, both in academic journals and for professional audiences. …

FIG – John H. Salmela passes away

Here’s a longer tribute. (PDF)

Champions are made …

slacklining Victoria Falls

After two years of preparation, 26-year old economic science student Lukas Irmler from Germany and 34-year old journalist and author Reinhard Kleindl from Austria, achieved their sought-after goal: balancing on a one-inch wide webbing in a height of 100 metres, right in front of the unique setting of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. …

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

train today for tomorrow

getting kids to make corrections

Zari Goldmann via the Swing Big email newsletter:

“How do I get my kids to make the corrections I’m telling them to? …

1. Don’t overload them – too many corrections is almost as bad as none. …

2. Have them repeat it back …

3. Have them say it before their next turn …

4. Decrease difficulty and increase expectations …

5. Reinforce it when they do make changes

read more …

All WAG coaches should be following SwingBig.org

keep-calm-and-listen-to-your-coach

determination and satisfaction

THERE’S NO NEED TO YELL WHEN YOU’RE THE ONE WITH THE GUN

Jag Gym:

angry-cop-mall-300x198Think about it: The man is a police officer. He has the power of the law behind him, not to mention a fully loaded gun at his hip. Did he really need to shout to be heard when I was sitting in my car, pulled over, ready to cooperate?

Yet, how often are we guilty of being harsh with our students, athletes, subordinates or children?

I know I am guilty of it.

Too often I will continue to hammer long after the point has been made, despite the fact that the person in front of me is clearly remorseful. Too frequently I will forget that my words and actions can shake someone to the core …

THERE’S NO NEED TO YELL WHEN YOU’RE THE ONE WITH THE GUN

Coaches need to stay calm. Be dispassionate. Learn to overcome anger.

World’s Toughest Sport – Gymnastics

Michael S. Yessis:

… we ranked 40 sports …

The categories are:

FITNESS (f).
SKILLS (s).
BRAINS (b).
PAIN (p).
CONTACT (c).
VENUE (v).
INTANGIBLES (i).

1. GYMNASTICS (567.6 OUT OF 1,095.4)
2. IRONMAN TRIATHLON (566.6)
3. ROCK CLIMBING (558.8)
4. ICE HOCKEY (524.9)
5. BULL RIDING (523.4) …

USAG

(via Gymnast Crossing)

CrossFit® Letting Beauty Speak

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

(via Debbie Broderick Rodriguez)

grounding helicopter parents

Another great post from Anne Josephson:

1. Who is upset in this situation: me or my child?

2. Is my child in serious physical, emotional or psychological danger?

3. Can my child handle this herself?

4. Is there a difference in power between my child and the person/people causing her problem?

5. Do I need to intervene immediately or can it wait?

Patience. Patience.

It’s a learned skill.

6. Do I need to intervene immediately or can it wait?

7. Am I parenting from a place of fear?

Gym Jag – GROUNDING YOUR HELICOPTER PARENT: 7 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF WHEN YOU ARE TEMPTED TO INTERVENE

optimal parent

related – GET PSYCHED! – It’s Only Gymnastics:

Last week I heard a story about a family who got kicked out of a gymnastics competition because the father caused a huge emotional scene during his daughter’s competition. …

coaching difficult athletes

Let’s face it. If you teach or coach long enough, inevitably you will have some students who you find irritating, abrasive or exasperating. …

… you owe it to the child, yourself as a professional and to the profession at large to find ways to rise above your feelings and find a way to positively work with these students.

Here are 20 actions that might help you make the transition from difficult to delightful student.

Ask yourself why you find this child difficult. …

Check to see if it is just the age you find difficult. …

Fake it until you make it. …

Use neutral language that describes the behavior, not the child. Watch the labeling and the backhanded name calling. A child is not a headcase, rather she is struggling with fear. She is not lazy, but she isn’t working to the level that you know she is capable.

Give the athlete some responsibly. …

Set clear rules and standards and reinforce them consistently. …

Refrain from arguing, lecturing or yelling. ….

Commit to keeping your cool. No matter what. …

If all else fails, own that you might not be the right fit and have the courage to let the child move on. …

frustrated-coach-1

Jag GymWhen You Want to Tear Your Hair Out: 20 Tips for Coaching Difficult Athletes

Click through to read the rest. I’m really enjoying Anne Josephson’s blog these days. :-)