Entries Tagged 'parents' ↓

gymnasts staying healthy

Gymnastics is a dangerous sport. We have to do everything we can to prevent traumatic and overuse injury.

Al Fong points out that we ALSO need do everything we can to avoid illness.

Do:
– Eat nutritiously and stay away from junk food, including sodas.
– Get plenty of sleep and rest.
– Practice proper hygiene –wash your hands often, brush your teeth, use deodorant and mouth wash.
– Regularly clean your wrist bands to prevent rips on your wrists.
– Keep your finger nails and toe nails trimmed.

Don’t:
– Drink from the same bottle or share the same spoon or fork with others.
– Spray your mouth from the spray bottle at the chalk tray.
– Lick your fingers or hands as you chalk up during bars.
– Spit on your hands.
– Tear your rips. Instead, neatly clip them with finger nail clippers.
– Workout without properly warming up and stretching.

Do’s and Don’ts

healthysnacks for gymnast

related – Coach Cassie – Healthy & Easy Snacking for Gymnasts: Pre, During & Post Workout Printable

reducing parent complaints

Gym Jag:


complain-12. Have a clear, written information packet about team philosophy, policies and procedures. …

4. Commit to an atmosphere of collaboration and good faith. …

6. Make sure parents know whom they need to go to for what. …

10. Document any injuries or physical complaints and follow up with parents immediately. …

11. Give all kids equal attention. …

14. Be very clear about move up criteria. …

15 TIPS TO ELIMINATE PARENT COMPLAINTS FOREVER

Click through to read the rest. :-)

THERE’S NO NEED TO YELL WHEN YOU’RE THE ONE WITH THE GUN

Jag Gym:

angry-cop-mall-300x198Think about it: The man is a police officer. He has the power of the law behind him, not to mention a fully loaded gun at his hip. Did he really need to shout to be heard when I was sitting in my car, pulled over, ready to cooperate?

Yet, how often are we guilty of being harsh with our students, athletes, subordinates or children?

I know I am guilty of it.

Too often I will continue to hammer long after the point has been made, despite the fact that the person in front of me is clearly remorseful. Too frequently I will forget that my words and actions can shake someone to the core …

THERE’S NO NEED TO YELL WHEN YOU’RE THE ONE WITH THE GUN

Coaches need to stay calm. Be dispassionate. Learn to overcome anger.

grounding helicopter parents

Another great post from Anne Josephson:

1. Who is upset in this situation: me or my child?

2. Is my child in serious physical, emotional or psychological danger?

3. Can my child handle this herself?

4. Is there a difference in power between my child and the person/people causing her problem?

5. Do I need to intervene immediately or can it wait?

Patience. Patience.

It’s a learned skill.

6. Do I need to intervene immediately or can it wait?

7. Am I parenting from a place of fear?

Gym Jag – GROUNDING YOUR HELICOPTER PARENT: 7 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF WHEN YOU ARE TEMPTED TO INTERVENE

optimal parent

related – GET PSYCHED! – It’s Only Gymnastics:

Last week I heard a story about a family who got kicked out of a gymnastics competition because the father caused a huge emotional scene during his daughter’s competition. …

hey coach – put the phone away

Tony Retrosi:

When you are in the gym, DON’T BRING YOUR CELL PHONE IN WITH YOU.

I know you “just want to video that skill”.

Don’t just put down your smartphone, put it away. Once it is out of sight, it’s less likely to distract you and shows your gymnasts that they are priority. …

Kids Learn from our examples

I’m with Tony on this one.

Certainly some coaches manage their smart phones well in the gym. But most don’t. Especially the addicts.

That goes for the gymnasts, too, of course.

Jordan Jovtchev phone

coaching difficult athletes

Let’s face it. If you teach or coach long enough, inevitably you will have some students who you find irritating, abrasive or exasperating. …

… you owe it to the child, yourself as a professional and to the profession at large to find ways to rise above your feelings and find a way to positively work with these students.

Here are 20 actions that might help you make the transition from difficult to delightful student.

Ask yourself why you find this child difficult. …

Check to see if it is just the age you find difficult. …

Fake it until you make it. …

Use neutral language that describes the behavior, not the child. Watch the labeling and the backhanded name calling. A child is not a headcase, rather she is struggling with fear. She is not lazy, but she isn’t working to the level that you know she is capable.

Give the athlete some responsibly. …

Set clear rules and standards and reinforce them consistently. …

Refrain from arguing, lecturing or yelling. ….

Commit to keeping your cool. No matter what. …

If all else fails, own that you might not be the right fit and have the courage to let the child move on. …

frustrated-coach-1

Jag GymWhen You Want to Tear Your Hair Out: 20 Tips for Coaching Difficult Athletes

Click through to read the rest. I’m really enjoying Anne Josephson’s blog these days. :-)

another great Simone Biles article

Bela:

“World champion is an understatement.”

Simone:

“I’ve never been to a party, like, ever. I don’t even know what they do there.”

Simone bounce

The Next Olympic Star

related – Caroline Price posted a career retrospective (so far) on Simone Biles.

vision impaired gymnast Adrianna Kenebrew

Inspiring.

… In early October, the Houston sixth grader competed in a gymnastics meet, six days before undergoing laser surgery for her glaucoma, the 12th surgery she’s had in her young life. …

“I just really want to be Gabby Douglas … “

… the surgery went well and it will take one to two months to determine the effect it had on the tissues. …

When Adrianna was 4 she asked for a balance beam and started attending the Texas Academy of Acrobatics and Gymnastics (TAAG). According to Asha, her coaches may not even have realized anything was wrong because Adrianna went out and did the same things as the other students. …
Adrianna

In 2013, the Texas Amateur Athletic Federation named her the TAAG Female Athlete of the Year. …

11-year-old blind gymnast inspires, aims for gold

Aussie school bans cartwheel

Not for the first time Down Under, overprotective staff at Peregian Springs State School in Queensland banned handstands and cartwheels on the playground (unless they were supervised) after two children were injured.

Not surprisingly, Principal Gwen Sands was “held up to ridicule by the media“.

It was a bad call.

Anna Cartwheel

Unfortunately upset parents at the school launched personal attacks on the Principal via Facebook and Twitter. That’s also wrong. :-(

Thanks George.

Ellie & Beckie Downie

The story of 2 sisters with 1 dream, Becky and Ellie Downie. Women’s Artistic Gymnastics Great Britain.

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube. (27min)

Kindle Fire HD Kids Edition

Essentially, the Kids Edition is a standard Kindle Fire HD tablet — at either the 6-inch or 7-inch size — with a pile of add-on features that are designed for kids and the havoc they tend to wreak.

You pay a $50 premium over the standard version, which amounts to $149 for the 6-inch version and $189 for the 7-inch base model. But for that $50 you get a few special bonuses. The first is a one-year subscription to Amazon FreeTime Unlimited, the company’s set of kid-friendly content that includes 5,000 games, videos, and books. You also get a gigantic case that protects the tablet and makes it easier for small children to hold. Last but certainly not-least is a 2-year, no-questions-asked warranty. …

The tablet itself is a relatively uninspiring affair, blocky and low-end. But it also appears to be more durable than the average cheap tablet …

The Verge

Photos and videos are uploaded by default to the parent’s account. For approval.

Kindle kids

related – Kindle Fire HD Kids Edition Has 2-Year Replacement Offer

Gym Jag – choose words carefully

Hint: The best of the best always choose the second option.

Sacrifice vs. Choice
Pressure vs. Drive
Failure vs. Setback
Short-term vs. Long-term goals
Criticism vs. Coaching
Tragedy vs. Disappointment
Difficulty vs. Challenge
Competition vs. Motivation
Winning vs. Celebrating
Quit vs. End (or retire)

Napoleon Hill wrote, “Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” …

Words have power. Choose them carefully.

10 WORD CHOICES THAT SMART ATHLETES (AND THEIR PARENTS AND COACHES) MAKE TO BE THE BEST OF THE BEST

GymnasticsFabric_preview

on parents watching Gymnastics

This article by Kim Dale got some angry responses from coaches and parents. Click through to read the comments on that post and on our Facebook page.

original post ___

Kim Z Dale:

Why are you staying? Be free. This isn’t the Olympics. You don’t need to watch every move. …

To the parents at my daughter’s gymnastics class: Why are you there?

aly-raisman-parents1