lacking confidence = increased risk of injury

47 athletes training for Cirque du Soleil were studied:

injury, emotional exhaustion, self-efficacy and fatigue were associated with an increase in injury risk (risk ratios between 1.8 and 2.8), but Conflicts/Pressure was not (risk ratio=0.8). Of the several specific psychological aspects that are considered risk factors for injury, low self-efficacy had the strongest relationship. …

British Journal of Sports Medicine – Psychological predictors of injuries in circus artists: an exploratory study

What’s “low self-efficacy“, the factor that correlated highest with injury?

GRETCHEN REYNOLDS in the New York Times explains:

Hoping to discern what traits separated the injury-prone from the impervious, Dr. Hallé and colleagues from McGill University in Montreal compared data from the athletes’ psychological questionnaires with their medical charts. What they found was that a person’s level of confidence could significantly affect his or her risk of sustaining an injury. …

What the Circus Can Teach Us About Sports Injuries

Lesson for coaches = coach for confidence. That means more successful progressions, more repetition and less spotting.

Dr. Hallé:

“Watch someone who is really good” at a task, whether it’s a twisting somersault from a trapeze platform or a 5K road race, and “notice each step that they take.”

… Every activity involves a series of discrete, manageable skills that you can practice individually, she said. “Succeeding at a portion of the task will show you that you have the capacity to succeed at the rest.” …

circus

(via Stacy Clark)

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coach Rick

Career gymnastics coach from Calgary, Canada.

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